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En Español

9 months old


With lots of love and praise, you’ll enjoy encouraging your nine-month-old to move on to new achievements. Toys that respond to actions will reward your baby with fun surprises … and reward you with an “I did it!” expression.

    Catch a ball if it’s rolled right to him
    Use deliberate gestures, like waving bye-bye or lifting arms to say, “Pick me up!”
month tile

How your 9-month-old might play now:

She adjusts her posture as she moves, using furniture to steady herself

If a ball is rolled right to him, he can catch it

Her movements are more varied and deliberate

He can indicate with gestures, perhaps waving goodbye or lifting his arms to be picked up

She may follow your gaze

He can reach for a toy without falling over

Her hands are more dexterous; she can pass objects between them

Children develop at their own pace and reach milestones at different times. The highlights mentioned in this website are approximate guidelines only. If you have any questions about your child's development, consult your healthcare provider.

Toys and Playtips

Help your baby learn more:

Build it and they will play. Build a pile of blocks for baby and a pile for you. Stack up your blocks, pointing out which one is at the top and the bottom. Encourage baby to play along, either "helping" you build your pile or building with his own blocks. The most fun is likely to come from baby knocking over your pile … again and again!

Simple shapes. For shape-sorting, start simply. Let baby get the hang of putting the round shape through the round hole, then move on, going from simple shapes to ones that need more maneuvering to make them fit. You’ll help baby gain confidence this way.

Color intro. Use the toy's features to introduce your baby to various colors, saying each color name clearly as you point it out on the toy.

Help your baby learn more:

Clear the way. To make baby's cruising adventures as safe as possible, make sure you clear a path all around the toy.

Reinforce language concepts by using descriptive words as you and your child play with the toy: "See the green ball going up and down, in and out?"

Make a game of participating by giving toys back to baby as she plays.

Build baby's excitement and anticipation by calling attention to surprises: "I wonder where the ball is?" That gets baby to think, even at this young age, about estimation.

Help your baby learn more:

What do you think? Demonstrate activities on the toy, then encourage your child to do the same: "I turned the dial … now it's your turn!" "Do you think we'll hear a sound when you press the button?" Simple mechanics will hold your child's attention – and improve fine motor skills at the same time.

So many colors! Help your child learn to recognize colors by pointing out each one and slowly saying its name. Reinforce the learning by pointing out things in baby's world that are the same color: "See? Your shirt is red too."

More to learn. Down the road, your child will be ready for letter, number and shape recognition. You can help things along by pointing these out on the toy, and then pointing out matching ones you see in everyday things around you.

Help your baby learn more:

Talk to your baby as often as you can. As you talk through daily activities, you’ll introduce baby to the basic patterns and rhythms of speech.

Taking turns is another great activity. Initiate the "conversation," then listen and wait as your baby gazes back into your eyes and responds with a coo or babble. Say something back to help your child understand the idea of dialogue.

Mimic your baby's coos and babbles, which are critical for practicing how to make sounds, learning the ways sounds differ and how they can be combined.

Start reading to your baby early and instill a love of books. When you read together, point out pictures and encourage baby to point to them, too. Make the sounds of animals in books, or the sounds that other things make.